“Beware of the Facebook Notification Virus”

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“Beware of the Facebook Notification Virus”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

You are on your Facebook account, answering messages, liking posts, watching videos, and commenting on your friend’s photos. Suddenly, you receive a message from your friend Sam. The message contains a link to a funny cat video in which a cat in a hat is dancing with a maraca in its mouth. The message below the video says “Hilarious video. You NEED to check it out!”. Without giving it a second thought you click on the link to view the video. But, instead of viewing the video you get redirected to a site that you don’t recognize or trust. Naturally, you exit out of the browser thinking that maybe Sam has attached the wrong URL. But, it is too late. Your device has already been infected.

 

Security experts have identified a form of adware that targets social media users tricking them into infecting their own devices. It is known as the “Facebook Notification Virus”. This virus displays messages saying that they are from Facebook. The “Facebook Notification Virus” creates many different forms of messages, including:

  • Friend Requests
  • Chat Messages

 

Some of the notifications that the user received are real copies of notifications that users would see on the real social media site (making the fake notifications seem legit). While other notifications are presenting new features. The purpose of this adware is to redirect users to specific websites, most likely malicious websites, so that the user’s device becomes infected with malicious software. This virus does not just lead users to malicious websites, it also:

  • Monitors User Activity
  • Collects User Information
  • Records Browsing History
  • Tracks Cookies
  • Tracks Keystrokes
  • Tracks IP Addresses
  • Tracks Geographic Location
  • Tracks Zip Codes
  • Tracks Demographic Profiles
  • Tracks Emails
  • Tracks Telephone Numbers
  • Tracks Usernames
  • Tracks Passwords

 

After all this information is collected, the collector, hacker, will then attempt to sell your confidential information on Darknet Markets, then falling into the hands of much more malicious cyber criminals.

 

So, how does this virus spread?

 

The “Facebook Notification Virus” can be spread a few different ways, including:

  • Freeware
  • Shareware
  • Pirated copies of paid utilities.

 

Another way that it can spread is through spam emails. The sender of the spam emails wants you to open the so that his or her tool can get inside your system and infect it.

 

To protect your data and system from the “Facebook Notification Virus”, if you receive any suspicious messages from “Facebook”, you should:

  • Check your system, because you may have been infected.
  • Be careful of the software that you allow in your machine.
  • Verify the email addresses of the “companies” that have messaged you (visit the contact page on the official website of the “company” to verify the email address).

 

If you have any questions relating to the “Facebook Notification Virus”, cyber security, or computer forensics contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954)727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.


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“How Your Anti-Virus Can Turn On You”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

Imagine, you are sitting at your computer knowing that you did everything that you could to protect the files that are on it. You bought the best anti-virus software on the market, thinking that this would be your last line of defense. Now imagine the day you find out that your anti-virus software has been flipped and now works for the hackers. No one wants to believe that something that protects them could also be used against them. It is a nightmare when you find out that your anti-virus software is a double agent working for the hackers.

 

An Anti-Virus software is a computer program that is used for scanning, identifying, and removing viruses from your computer. Primarily, they are used to protect your computer. Now, image that this program that has access to all your files has gone to “the dark side” and has provided unfettered access to hackers. This type of attack used by hackers is called a “Double Agent” attack.

 

A “Double Agent” attack is an attack that takes over the anti-virus software of PC computers running Windows. This type of attack is performed by hackers. Once in control of the anti-virus software the hacker converts the anti-virus software into malware. The malware then acts on the hacker’s behalf to encrypt the files on the computer holding them for ransom.

 

A “Double Agent” attack can compromise the 14 major anti-virus software available. This type of attack can easily be executed by someone working out of their parent’s basement or a 13-year-old script kid. The way in which these individuals would infect a computer with a double agent attack can include having the user:

·        Access Malicious URLS

·        Download Malicious Attachments

 

To prevent the “Double Agent” attack from occurring, organizations and businesses should:

·        Monitor for spoofed emails.

·        Set up administration controls to prevent downloads from unknown sources.

·        Regularly update anti-virus software in all systems.

 

If you have any questions relating to “Double Agent” Attacks or Computer Forensics and Cyber Security contact FDS Global. You can reach us at your office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.


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“They key to you Cyber Castle”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

How many of you have a Windows home and/or work computer? How many of you store important or confidential documents and information on those computers? Are you ever worried that a hacker may get their hands on that information?

 

Did you know that a security companion for Windows 10 and Windows Hello Users exists? This new security companion can provide a two-factor authentication for a device and/or PC, it is an encryption key.

 

A encryption key is a small USB like device that you can carry around with you allowing you to be able to add two-factor authentication to various services and applications on your PC.

 

If you have installed the  encryption key on your PC and then someone unauthorized tries to gain access to your information they would not only need to know your password, but they would also need to physically have your encryption key USB to gain access.

 

When using the encryption key USB there is more to using the device than just plugging it into your computer and typing in your password. You also need to insert the USB device, give it a second, and then press on the “touch-to-sign” metal area on the USB, as well as typing in your password.

 

One specific encryption key USB is created by Yubico. It is called the Yubikey. Yubico has recently released an app in the Microsoft store that allows you to link your Yubikey up with your PC as a Security companion. Some other services that work with Yubikey, as well as Windows 10 and Windows Hello, are:

  • Google
  • DashLane
  • KeePass
  • DropBox
  • Evernote
  • WordPress
  • Github
  • As wells as other things like disk encryption

 

Ranging from $40 (for the regular version) to $50 (for the USB & NFC Version), the three main types of Yubikey that are on sale now are:

  1. Yubikey 4 (USB)– http://amzn.to/2i9B0Iw
  2. Yubikey 4 Nano (USB)– http://amzn.to/2icnFu0
  3. Yubikey NEO (USB & NFC)– http://amzn.to/2jzlHcj

 

Even though a Yubikey does not have the bio-authentication ability that is so demanded by consumers, it does allow you to unlock and log into your PC/Device by just inserting a physical device into the system.

 

If you have any questions about the Security of you PC and/or devices, or if you have become a victim to Cyber Crime feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global or give our office a call at (954)727-1957.