“The Travelers Guide To Wi-Fi Hacking”

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“The Travelers Guide To Wi-Fi Hacking”

Dear Blast Reader,

Do you stay at hotels when you travel? Do you ever use the hotel internet? Did you know that there may be someone spying on you while you are in your hotel? Did you know that hackers target hotel Wi-fi? Did you know that the hackers that target hotel wi-fi also target traveling business professionals?

 

Hotel wi-fi is targeted and compromised to assist in the delivering of the malicious payload to the selected victims. A ­payload is the part of the malware that performs the malicious action. Those behind the attack continually evolve the malware’s tactics and payload. It is believed that the attackers are exploiting the vulnerabilities in the server software, either by:

  • Gaining remote access.
  • Physically gaining access to the hotel and the hotel’s servers.

 

Now, attackers are using a new form of malware known as the “Inexsmar Attack”. This attack starts with a phishing email.  To make the email look real, the message is tailored to you. This email address you by name, and has real looking documents attached.

 

But, looks can be deceiving. Within this email there is a self-extracting archive package. This is a package that begins the trojan downloader process. A trojan downloader process is a malicious program, usually installed through an exploit or some other deceptive means. Using email attachments the malware is installed onto your computer. Once you are convinced to open the attachment, hackers will then initiate their malware attack.

 

How does the malware go un-detected?

To prevent being detected, the malware is downloaded in stages. These stages include:

  1. Hiding malicious codes and strings by linking malicious code to otherwise unrelated code.
  2. The malware then runs an operation to download the second part of the payload, the trojan malware.

 

So, as your defences improve, it is believed that the multi-stage download for the trojan malware is an evolutionary way to keep the trojan viable.

So, how do you protect yourself?

To protect yourself against this new form of advanced and evolutionary trojan malware, here are a few tips:

  1. Use public wi-fi as little as possible. Hackers exploit public wi-fi in places like coffee shops, restaurants, and hotels.
  2. Use a Virtual Private Network, also known as a VPN. VPNs are encrypted web browsers that hide your IP addresses & your location.

 

If you have any questions about Hacking, Malware, Cyber Security, or Computer Forensics contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit out website at www.FDS.Global.


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“Every Post You Make, Every Status Update, I Will Be Watching You”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

Do you ever feel like someone is watching you? Even when you are just sitting behind your computer? Feeling like someone is taking account of every keystroke that you make and every website you visit? This is the type of feeling that sends shivers down your spine. You don’t know who, or what, is giving you that feeling. This is a feeling that cannot be remedied. Whenever you go online, whenever you sit behind your computer you feel like there are eyes on you.

Cyber stalking is when you are being constantly frightened and/or harassed by someone through electronic means, such as the internet. Some of the forms that Cyber stalking take on, including:

  • Harassing a victim.
  • Embarrassing and/or humiliation of a victim.
  • Gaining financial control over a victim. Usually, by destroying their credit or by draining their bank accounts.
  • Harassing friends and family members of the victim.
  • Frightening a victim, using scare tactics and threats.

 

Within the United States of America, there are 14 out of 50 states that have laws against cyber stalking and cyber harassment. Under the “American Anti-Stalking, Slander & Harassment Law”, Cyber stalking is considered a criminal offense. The results of being convicted include:

  • A restraining order
  • Probation
  • Criminal Penalties (including prison time)

 

If convicted, the sentences range from a fourth-degree charge to a second-degree charge. A fourth-degree charge means 18 months in prison with a fine of $10,000. A second-degree charge means 10 years in prison with a $150,000 fine.

 

So, how do you protect yourself, your family, and/or your PC from Cyber stalkers?

Here are a few tips:

  1. Maintain caution over the physical access to your computer, and any other web-enabled device, including your cellphone.
  2. Make sure you ALWAYS log out of computer programs when you leave the computer. Also, remember to lock your computer when stepping away.
  3. When it comes to online calendars or itineraries, delete them or make them private.
  4. Use privacy settings on any, and all online accounts.
  5. Use trusted and updated security software to stop spyware from getting onto your computer through an infected web page or phishing attack.
  6. If you do suspect that someone is using spyware to track your day-to-day activities, seek help.

 

If you have any questions about Cyber stalking, Spyware, Computer Forensics or Cyber Security contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.


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“Your Medical Records Are Next

Dear Blast Readers,

 

Have you ever worried about your credit/debit card information being stolen by hackers? Did you ever think that by visiting your doctor’s office your identity could be stolen? Did you know that, when it comes to protecting customer information, the healthcare system is behind the financial sector by about 10 years?

 

As more hospitals, doctor’s offices, and healthcare facilities go from paper records to digital records more hacking issues are expected. More personal information can be accessed by hackers because more is accessible online.

 

One of the challenges of protecting patient data is that the data is stored digitally. By storing patient information digitally, all devices that have access to this information have access to the internet. With internet access, these devices and the information they have access to can be breached by hackers. Also, data breaches can potentially occur when the patient data is being transmitted over the internet to the cloud. Many hospitals and doctor’s offices utilize cloud servers to store patient data without the patient’s knowledge. Hackers can exploit a vulnerability on the devices, with access to the cloud, compromising millions of patient files.

 

What makes health records so valuable to cyber criminals is the personal nature and its shelf life. Health records contain information such as:

  • Policy Numbers
  • Medical History
  • Billing Information
  • Social Security Numbers

 

Even though some patient data, such as Credit/Debit card information, can be shut down when fraudulent activity is detected. Other data cannot be changed that easily, such as Social Security numbers. So, it is important to protect that information so data breaches do not occur.

 

How can Doctor’s offices, hospitals and healthcare facilities protect patient data?

There are multiple ways that patient data can be protected. Some ways include:

  • Encryption Platforms. Encrypting data makes sure that all data that is being exchanged is done so safely.
  • Back-up patient records. By backing-up patient records this gives hackers less motivation to go after those organizations and their records. All back-ups should be kept in a secure environment.
  • Employ biometric authentication. This helps control and limit access to labs and records to only authorized personnel.
  • Device Management. Device management protects devices in case of theft.

 

If you have any questions about Hacking, Data Security, Cyber Security or Computer Forensics contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.


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“IoT Devices Beware: The BrickerBot”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

Do you leave your IoT (Internet of Things) Devices connected to the internet? Did you know that if you leave you IoT devices connected to the internet, even when you are not using them, it opens doors allowing hackers more time to gain control of your devices? Did you know that there is a form of malware that leaves your device impossible to use once infected?

 

A BrickerBot is a form of malware that has been created to infect a collection of devices. The “Bricker” in “BrickerBot” is referring to rendering a device, or devices, completely useless or inoperable, like a brick used as a paperweight. This is accomplished when the BrickerBot corrupts the device’s storage capabilities.

 

The way in which BrickerBots behave do not always match up with the behavior of traditional botnets. A botnet is a network of devices that have been infected. Their purpose is to keep the infected devices around for as long as possible.

 

Most botnets can be used for:

  • Sending out spam.
  • DDoS Attacks (also known as “Distributed Denial of Service Attacks”).
  • Phishing Attacks.

 

BrickerBot Malware uses a “Permanent Denial of Service” attack or PDDoS attack. This is when the BrickerBot physically disables the device.

 

How?

 

The device is physically disabled when the BrickerBot corrupts the firmware on the devices. Usually the only way to fix this is to replace the device, or if possible re-install the firmware.

 

BrickerBots use a set of commands to help accomplish their end goal of “Bricking” your smart devices. These commands will:

  • Render Flash storage useless by writing random bits to the storage drives on the devices.
  • Disabling TCP Time stamps, leaving connectivity vulnerable.
  • Limiting the processes that the devices can run at once.

 

How are you supposed to protect yourself from a BrickBot?

To protect yourself and your IoT Devices from BrickBots, you should:

  • Change your login information (BrickBots come with a dictionary containing default login information).
  • Limit the internet connectivity your device has. (Leaving your IoT devices connected, especially when you are not using them, gives hackers more time to take control and infect your devices.)
  • Install updates as frequently as they become available.

 

It is important to remember:

  • Every device that is smart and/or has internet connectivity should have STRONG PASSWORDS.
  • Take security into your own hands, do not rely on default security from the manufactures. (Remember: BrickBots come with a dictionary that contains default login information. Changing your login information should make your devices harder to hack.)

 

If you have any questions relating to IoT Devices, IoT Security, Hacking, Cyber Security or Computer Forensics contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.