“Every Post You Make, Every Status Update, I Will Be Watching You”

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“Every Post You Make, Every Status Update, I Will Be Watching You”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

Do you ever feel like someone is watching you? Even when you are just sitting behind your computer? Feeling like someone is taking account of every keystroke that you make and every website you visit? This is the type of feeling that sends shivers down your spine. You don’t know who, or what, is giving you that feeling. This is a feeling that cannot be remedied. Whenever you go online, whenever you sit behind your computer you feel like there are eyes on you.

Cyber stalking is when you are being constantly frightened and/or harassed by someone through electronic means, such as the internet. Some of the forms that Cyber stalking take on, including:

  • Harassing a victim.
  • Embarrassing and/or humiliation of a victim.
  • Gaining financial control over a victim. Usually, by destroying their credit or by draining their bank accounts.
  • Harassing friends and family members of the victim.
  • Frightening a victim, using scare tactics and threats.

 

Within the United States of America, there are 14 out of 50 states that have laws against cyber stalking and cyber harassment. Under the “American Anti-Stalking, Slander & Harassment Law”, Cyber stalking is considered a criminal offense. The results of being convicted include:

  • A restraining order
  • Probation
  • Criminal Penalties (including prison time)

 

If convicted, the sentences range from a fourth-degree charge to a second-degree charge. A fourth-degree charge means 18 months in prison with a fine of $10,000. A second-degree charge means 10 years in prison with a $150,000 fine.

 

So, how do you protect yourself, your family, and/or your PC from Cyber stalkers?

Here are a few tips:

  1. Maintain caution over the physical access to your computer, and any other web-enabled device, including your cellphone.
  2. Make sure you ALWAYS log out of computer programs when you leave the computer. Also, remember to lock your computer when stepping away.
  3. When it comes to online calendars or itineraries, delete them or make them private.
  4. Use privacy settings on any, and all online accounts.
  5. Use trusted and updated security software to stop spyware from getting onto your computer through an infected web page or phishing attack.
  6. If you do suspect that someone is using spyware to track your day-to-day activities, seek help.

 

If you have any questions about Cyber stalking, Spyware, Computer Forensics or Cyber Security contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.



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“Printers Beware”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

Did you know that 54% of employee’s say that they do not always follow the security policies put into place by their company’s Information Technology departments? * Did you know that about 51% of employees who have a printer, copier, or a multi functioning printer (MFP) at their work place say that they have copied, printed, and/or scanned confidential documents at work before? *

 

With cyber threats on the rise, it is not a shock that even printers are not safe from cyber attacks and data breaches. If a printer is connected to a wireless network and is unsecure, then it is open to hacking. Once compromised, other devices connected to the same network are left vulnerable.

 

How can a hacker gain access to a network using an unsecure printer?

 

One way a hacker can gain access to your unsecured printer is if the firmware is out-of-date. This allows the system to accept malicious lines of code. The hacker can then use the code to gain access to:

  • Print Jobs.
  • The user’s computer.

 

Another way a hacker can gain access to your unsecured printer is using a drone. Along with a drone the hacker would need a mobile phone and two applications. The two applications would do the following:

  • The first application identifies all wireless printers
  • The second application deploys malware into the printers.

 

So how does this type of drone attack occur?

 

Firstly, the hacker would fly a drone using a smart phone into position outside of an office building. Once into position, the hacker activates the two applications. Once the first application scans for open Wi-Fi printers, the second application establishes a fake access point (one that mimics the real device). Once established, the fake access point is then able to intercept documents that have been sent to the real device. With network access gained, the hacker can then in-bed malware into the company’s network.

 

When malware is installed within the network, hackers can gain access to your servers and documents by:

  • Accessing sensitive and/or confidential information.
  • Changing the printer’s settings or LCD readout.
  • Launching DoS attacks (Denial-of-service attacks).
  • Using the printer to receive and transmit faxes.
  • To send unauthorized print jobs.
  • Retrieving saved copies of documents.
  • Eavesdropping on network printer traffic.

 

To take preventative measures against attacks on your printers Some typical prevention procedures include, but are not imited to:

  • Educating Employees on the importance of security
  • Defining what constitutes a secure password
  • User identification (with PINs and other verification) for printer usage.
  • Data encryption protocols (to prevent interception of data across the network).

 

If you any questions relating to Firmware, Network Security, Printer Security, Cyber Security or Computer Forensics contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.

 

 

*(The statistics represented in this blast were identified from: Network, C. (2013, February 07). The Hidden IT Security Threat: Multifunction Printers. Retrieved April 25, 2017, from https://www.forbes.com/sites/ciocentral/2013/02/07/the-hidden-it-security-threat-multifunction-printers/#b615affb615a )*


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“Beware of the Facebook Notification Virus”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

You are on your Facebook account, answering messages, liking posts, watching videos, and commenting on your friend’s photos. Suddenly, you receive a message from your friend Sam. The message contains a link to a funny cat video in which a cat in a hat is dancing with a maraca in its mouth. The message below the video says “Hilarious video. You NEED to check it out!”. Without giving it a second thought you click on the link to view the video. But, instead of viewing the video you get redirected to a site that you don’t recognize or trust. Naturally, you exit out of the browser thinking that maybe Sam has attached the wrong URL. But, it is too late. Your device has already been infected.

 

Security experts have identified a form of adware that targets social media users tricking them into infecting their own devices. It is known as the “Facebook Notification Virus”. This virus displays messages saying that they are from Facebook. The “Facebook Notification Virus” creates many different forms of messages, including:

  • Friend Requests
  • Chat Messages

 

Some of the notifications that the user received are real copies of notifications that users would see on the real social media site (making the fake notifications seem legit). While other notifications are presenting new features. The purpose of this adware is to redirect users to specific websites, most likely malicious websites, so that the user’s device becomes infected with malicious software. This virus does not just lead users to malicious websites, it also:

  • Monitors User Activity
  • Collects User Information
  • Records Browsing History
  • Tracks Cookies
  • Tracks Keystrokes
  • Tracks IP Addresses
  • Tracks Geographic Location
  • Tracks Zip Codes
  • Tracks Demographic Profiles
  • Tracks Emails
  • Tracks Telephone Numbers
  • Tracks Usernames
  • Tracks Passwords

 

After all this information is collected, the collector, hacker, will then attempt to sell your confidential information on Darknet Markets, then falling into the hands of much more malicious cyber criminals.

 

So, how does this virus spread?

 

The “Facebook Notification Virus” can be spread a few different ways, including:

  • Freeware
  • Shareware
  • Pirated copies of paid utilities.

 

Another way that it can spread is through spam emails. The sender of the spam emails wants you to open the so that his or her tool can get inside your system and infect it.

 

To protect your data and system from the “Facebook Notification Virus”, if you receive any suspicious messages from “Facebook”, you should:

  • Check your system, because you may have been infected.
  • Be careful of the software that you allow in your machine.
  • Verify the email addresses of the “companies” that have messaged you (visit the contact page on the official website of the “company” to verify the email address).

 

If you have any questions relating to the “Facebook Notification Virus”, cyber security, or computer forensics contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954)727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.


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“The Stores Have Eyes”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

When you are out shopping, is there ever a moment that you look around because you feel someone is watching you? Like you are being followed or tracked? Did you know that some stores track their customers? Both physical stores and online stores are tracking their customers inside and outside of the stores.

 

Physical stores track their customers with applications and biometric technologies. They build databases about customer habits by logging information about what is bought and by who. Usually, customers don’t even know that they are being surveilled.

Online stores are becoming more and more invasive as they modify Ads for customers based on their customer’s:

  • Internet Preferences
  • Website Histories
  • Personal Information

 

Companies are tracking their customers a few ways, including:

  1. Following a digital trail. This trail is left behind by customers using things like: search engines, social media activity, and online shopping.
  2. Statistical Analysis. The linking of your different devices. What you do on your phone, tablet and/or computer. This data can then be combined into a customer reports.
  3. GPS Technology. Allows stores to follow you outside of the store sending customized messages when you are near the store.

 

This retail analysis happens with a black box that is closed to both individuals and federal regulators. Meaning that stores can compile massive amounts of customer data without a regulatory body overseeing the store’s future use of this data.

 

There are a few things that can be done that can ensure that retailers do not see their customer’s personal information, include:

  • Not using frequent shopper cards
  • Shutting off your Wi-Fi when entering a store
  • Shutting off Bluetooth when entering a store
  • Closing all applications, not just putting them to run in the background

 

If you have any questions relating to Computer Forensics and Cyber Security contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954)727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global\blog