“A Travelers Guide To Protecting Your Data”

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“A Travelers Guide To Protecting Your Data”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

When you hear the word “summer”, what is the first thing you think of? Vacation? Travel? Did you know that most people wont leave home without their smartphones, tablets, and/or computers? Have you ever wondered how traveling can compromise your digital security?

 

People tend to think of vacations as a time to get away and un-plug from the world, both the digital world and physical world. But, it is not realistic to believe that you will NEVER go online while traveling. Yes, it is fun to post pictures and status updates on your social media accounts in real time. But, did you know that by doing so, there is a possibility you are opening yourself, and your digital devices, to cyber criminals?

 

When traveling, public Wi-Fi might seem like a great thing. It allows you to check your email, work, and post updates to your social media accounts. But, as convent as it is, connecting to public Wi-Fi can also be dangerous. Cyber Criminals can take over public networks, and logging onto a corrupted network allows cyber criminals access to your:

  • Personal details
  • Credit card numbers
  • Passwords

 

The data that you, as a traveler, bring wherever you go is valuable and desired. It is important that while traveling you do everything in your power to keep your digital information safely out of the reach of cyber criminals.

 

How? Here are a few tips.

  • Only Use Secure Wi-Fi Networks. When connecting to a public network, consider using a Virtual Private Network, or VPN. This will ensure that your confidential information stays private. A VPN will also ensure that your data goes directly from your device to the network that you are connecting to.
  • Update Your Devices. Updating the software on your devices, as well as the applications updates, is important. Even though the constant update reminder can be annoying, it is your devices way of protecting you and your data.
  • Do Not Use Public Computers. Never use public computers when logging into to banking, email and social media accounts. This means computers in hotel business centers, as well as in-room iPads. Crooks can install keylogging software to track your keystrokes.
  • Secure Your Mobile Devices. Set a PIN for your devices. Setting a PIN can protect your device from unauthorized users.
  • Use Cash Whenever Possible. Using cash whenever possible while traveling keeps your credit/debit card safe from fraudsters. But, if you are to use your credit/debit cards, be cautious.
  • Backup all your devices. Before going on your trip, whether it is for business or vacation, it is a good idea to back up your mobile devices. This allows you to be able to retrieve your information if lost, in case of emergency, or stolen.
  • Critical information should be stored in a different location. When traveling, it is a good idea to store any critical and private information temporarily in a different location. Examples of different locations are: Flash Drives, Mobile Devices, or Cloud Storage.
  • Make sure your computer’s firewall is enabled. Enabling your computer’s firewall helps stop hackers from getting into your system, as well as keeping viruses from spreading and safeguards outgoing computer traffic.

 

If you have any questions about Digital Security, Hacking, Cyber Security, Computer Forensics, or Mobile Forensics contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954) 727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.


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“Life’s A Breach”

Dear Blast Readers,

 

Does your company use third-party vendors? Do those vendors make data security a priority? Does your company allow third-party vendors to access your companies network?

 

Third-party vendors are companies that offer services that the primary company can not support. It is considered a business necessity with most companies to outsource data management, activity processing, and storage to third-party vendors. But, did you know putting your company’s data into the hands of third-party vendors puts your data at risk of being breached?

 

It is common for hackers to try and use third-party vendors to gain access to a business’s data. Yes, businesses may have their own cyber security protocols in place, but access must be given to third-party vendors. When access to a business’s network spans out to a third-party, this is when possible network security vulnerabilities are created.

 

All businesses are responsible for the data that they collect, transmit, use and process, and they are still responsible for that data even when the data is entrusted to a third party.

 

If a third-party vendor gets hacked the consequences for your business varies, depending on the seriousness of the hack. A less serious hack can cause your business to lose vital data, and confidential employee information can be compromised. If the hack is a serious hack there are a few things that can happen, ranging from intense media attention to bankruptcy.

 

Outsourced contractors are often the primary targets of data breaches. So, it is important for the third-party vendors to takes data security seriously. But, how can you be sure if a third-party vendor is a security-conscious vendor? Some signs that a third-party vendor is security-conscious are:

  • The vendors have comprehensive security policies & disaster recovery plans in place and are updated and reviewed regularly.
  • Data Back-ups and recoveries are performed regularly. In case of hardware failure, the vendor has back-up servers to avoid interruptions.
  • Internal security audits are performed regularly.
  • Employees that have access to company data are vetted carefully (thorough background checks are performed).

 

But, as important as it is to make sure that the third-party vendors take data security seriously. It is also just as important to make sure that the data is secure on your end. To do that it is important to:

  • Have a strong internal security policy.
  • Know what data is sensitive & where it is located on your system. Never give one person access to more than one portion of your sensitive data.
  • Know your responsibilities and rights, as well at know those of your providers.

 

Another important aspect of a data breach is the reporting requirements. Reporting requirements differ depending upon the state in which the breach occurs. Additionally, if a breach involves information of clients across state or country lines, other reporting requirements will come into effect. It is vital to know your state’s cyber security breach reporting requirements.

 

If you have any questions about Data Breaches, Cyber Security, Computer Forensics, or Reporting requirements contact FDS Global. You can reach us at our office at (954)727-1957 or by email at RMoody@FDS.Global. Please feel free to visit our website at www.FDS.Global.